For many years there has been a need for aluminum sheet and plate alloys that would offer, for high strength welded applications, several distinct benefits over such alloys as 5052 and 6061. Some of the benefits fabricators have been seeking are greater design efficiency, better welding characteristics, good forming properties, excellent resistance to corrosion and the same economy as in other non heat-treatable alloys. Metallurgical research has developed 5083 and 5086 as superior weldable alloys which fill these needs. Both alloys have virtually the same characteristics with 5083 having slightly higher mechanical properties due to the increased manganese content over 5086. Applications: unfired pressure vessels, missile containers, heavy-duty truck and trailer assemblies, boat hulls and superstructures.

5086-H116
Mill Finish
AMS-QQ-A-250/7
Unit of Measure

Specifications

Material

N/A Aluminum

Shapeform

N/A Plate

Series

N/A 5086-H116

Grade

N/A 5086

Temper

N/A H116

Finish

N/A Mill

Thickness

N/A 0.250 inches
6.35 mm

Size

N/A 48 x 96

Width

N/A 48

Length

N/A 96

Sheet Weight per Unit Area

N/A 3.456 lbs/ft²
16.872192 kg/m²

Weight per Plate

N/A 110.59 lbs
50.09727 kg

ASTM Specification

N/A AMS-QQ-A-250/7
ASME SB-209
ASTM B209

Density

N/A 0.096 lbs/in³

Specific Gravity

N/A 2.66

Typical Mechanical Properties

Ultimate Strength

N/A 42 ksi

Yield Strength

N/A 30 ksi

Elongation percent in 2 inches

N/A 12
Modulus of Elasticity1 N/A 10.3 x 102 ksi

Comparative Characteristics and Applications

Resistance to Corrosion - General2 N/A A
Stress Corrosion Cracking3 N/A A
Workability (Cold)4 N/A B

Mechinability

N/A D
Brazeability5 N/A D
Gas Weldability6 N/A C
Arc Weldability7 N/A A
Resistance Spot and Seam Weldability8 N/A A

Applications

N/A Unfired, welded pressure vessels, marine, auto aircraft cryogenics, TV, towers, drilling rigs, transportation, equipment, missile components

Aluminum Alloy Designations

N/A

    The aluminum industry uses a four-digit index system for the designation of its wrought aluminum alloys.
    As outlined below, the first digit indicates the alloy group according to the major alloying elements.

    1xxx Series
    In this group minimum aluminum content is 99% and there is no major alloying element. The second digit indicates modifications in impurity limits. If the second digit is zero, there is no special control on individual impurities. Digits 1 through 9, which are assigned consecutively as needed, indicate special control of one or more individual impurities. The last two digits indicate specific minimum aluminum content. Although the absolute minimum aluminum content in this group is 99%, the minimum for certain grades is higher than 99%, and the last two digits represent the hundredths of a per cent over 99. Thus, 1030 would indicate 99.30% minimum aluminum. without special control on individual impurities. The designations 1130, 1230, 1330, etc.. indicate the same purity with special control on one or more impurities. Likewise 1100 indicates minimum aluminum content of 99.00% with individual impurity control.

    2xxx through 9xxx Series
    The major alloying elements are indicated by the first digit, as follows:
      2xxx Copper
      3xxx Manganese
      4xxx Silicon
      5xxx Magnesium
      6xxx Magnesium and silicon
      7xxx Zinc
      8xxx Other element
      9xxx Unused series

    The second digit indicates alloy modification. If the second digit is zero. it indicates the original alloy: digits 1 through 9, which are assigned consecutively, indicate alloy modifications. The last two digits have no special significance, serving only to identify the different alloys in the group.

    Experimental Alloys
    Experimental alloys are designated according to the four digit system, but they are prefixed by the letter X. The prefix is dropped when the alloy becomes standard. During development, and before they are designated as experimental, new alloys are identified by serial numbers assigned by their originators. Use of the serial number is discontinued when the X number is assigned.

  • 1 Average of tension and compression moduli. Compression modulus is about 2 percent greater than tension modulus.
  • 2 Ratings A through E are relative ratings in decreasing order of merit, based on exposures to sodium chloride solution by intermittent spraying or immersion. Alloys with A and B ratings can be used in industrial and seacoast atmospheres without protection. Alloys with C, D and E ratings generally should be protected at least on faying surfaces.
  • 3 Stress-corrosion cracking ratings are based on service experience and on laboratory tests of specimens exposed to the 3.5% sodium chloride alternate immersion test.
  • 4 Ratings A through D for Workability (cold), and A through E for Machinability, are relative ratings in decreasing order of merit.
  • 5 Ratings A through D for Weldability and Brazeability are relative ratings.
  • 6 A = Generally weldable by all commercial procedures and methods.
    B = Weldable with special techniques or for specific applications that justify preliminary trials or testing to develop welding procedure and weld performance.
    C = Limited weldability because of crack sensitivity or loss in resistance to corrosion and mechanical properties.
  • 7 A = Generally weldable by all commercial procedures and methods.
    B = Weldable with special techniques or for specific applications that justify preliminary trials or testing to develop welding procedure and weld performance.
    C = Limited weldability because of crack sensitivity or loss in resistance to corrosion and mechanical properties.
  • 8 A = Generally weldable by all commercial procedures and methods.
    B = Weldable with special techniques or for specific applications that justify preliminary trials or testing to develop welding procedure and weld performance.
    C = Limited weldability because of crack sensitivity or loss in resistance to corrosion and mechanical properties.